To the editor:

I respectfully disagree with your previous writer (Mary Mitchell letter to the editor, page 12 Buckhead Reporter, Sept. 10-23) about the ticketing and “entrapment” near the Buckhead Loop.

The far right lane that merges onto Piedmont Road from the loop road has been a private drive since the office building was constructed over 10 years ago. The signage is there and evident.

There are also several signs indicating that there is no right turn on red and most people sail on through the light with impunity. I have even been witness to someone complying and having another driver behind them honking at them to go through. If someone runs a red light or uses a lane that is off limits they risk a ticket – period.

I welcome the police ticketing if that is what it takes to alert folks that they are not supposed to use that lane if they are not entering the office building or if they have turned on a red light. During regular weekday rush hours these people pose a danger to those who are obeying the signs. They are often very aggressive in trying to merge into the through lane and are usually trying to beat out those who are at the light.

Some people just act as though the rules are for others and not for them because they are too busy/important to stay in the regular queue.

At least the police were not ticketing during rush hour and making congestion worse.

Leslie Gerber-Mann

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To the editor:

To Mary Mitchell concerning her issue with people obeying traffic signs.

If you are confused at the intersection of Buckhead Loop and Piedmont and never noticed the sign then you probably shouldn’t be driving. The sign is very visible and leaves no question as to what is allowed from the far right lane.

I was thrilled to see the police upholding traffic laws.

The real issue is those people that are trying to beat traffic by using that lane and then attempting to merge into the traffic on Piedmont. I would like to see more people pulled over for violating traffic laws.

Gerry Scheinman