Mandala: Sacred Circle in Tibetan Buddhism opens at the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University on Jan. 14 and continue through April 15. More than 100 masterworks will bring to light the intricate, transcendental, and evocative manifestations and functions of the “perfect circle” or mandala used as an aid in meditation and as a tool to obtain enlightenment.

Mandala is a Sanskrit word meaning “circle.” The mandala, one of Himalayan Buddhism’s most ubiquitous symbols, is created as an artistic aid for meditation. Depicting a realm that is both complex and sacred, the mandala is a visualization tool meant to advance practitioners toward a state of enlightenment. The exhibition explores the various manifestations of these objects, simultaneous explaining their symbolism, describing how they fulfill their intended function, and demonstrating their correlation to our physical reality.

The museum is 571 S. Kilgo Circle. For more information call (404) 727-4282 or visit carlos.emory.edu.

Collin Kelley

Collin Kelley has been the editor of Atlanta Intown for two decades and has been a journalist and freelance writer for 35 years. He’s also an award-winning poet and novelist.

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