Flanked by several blue 96-gallon curbside recycling carts, Mayor Kasim Reed announced an aggressive expansion of the City’s residential recycling program. Beginning October 15, the City of Atlanta will deliver 96-gallon recycling carts to 66,000 households, at the rate of one thousand per day. The citywide distribution of carts is a key component of the City’s sustainability plan, Power to Change, which has a long-term goal of achieving 90 percent diversion of municipal waste by 2020, among other measures.

The City of Atlanta’s recycling program is managed by the Department of Public Works and serves 95,000 households. The new 96-gallon recycling carts will replace residents’ current 18-gallon recycling bins, allowing for more recyclables to be collected. About 30,000 residents already have carts.

Currently, city of Atlanta residents generate 96,000 tons of trash annually, which costs the city $7 million a year to dispose of in landfills. City of Atlanta residents recycle only 12,000 tons annually, which leaves significant room for improvement. In addition to the environmental benefits, diverting recyclables from landfills produces revenue for the City at a rate of $30 per ton.

The push for expanded recycling will be led by a partnership among the City of Atlanta’s Mayor’s Office of Sustainability, Department of Public Works and the Curbside Value Partnership (CVP), which has been enlisted to help develop and measure an education campaign designed to educate and encourage residents about the best use of the new carts.

CVP is a national, invitation-only program designed to help communities grow their curbside programs through education. Since 2005, CVP has partnered with 30 communities and four states to develop, execute and measure highly effective education campaigns.

Collin Kelley

Collin Kelley has been the editor of Atlanta Intown for two decades and has been a journalist and freelance writer for 35 years. He’s also an award-winning poet and novelist.

8 replies on “Mayor announces expansion of residential recycling”

  1. I don’t want the larger bins! I recycle all I can in the small container (it’s just me most of the time, so that’s enough) and that bin can actually fit in my garage. The large blue rcycling bin will have to sit on the front side of my house just like the trash bin. What an eyesore. I wish there was a way to opt out of the larger recycling bins. I will never fill the large one. Just like I don’t fill my trash can.

  2. I don’t want the larger bins! I recycle all I can in the small container (it’s just me most of the time, so that’s enough) and that bin can actually fit in my garage. The large blue rcycling bin will have to sit on the front side of my house just like the trash bin. What an eyesore. I wish there was a way to opt out of the larger recycling bins. I will never fill the large one. Just like I don’t fill my trash can.

  3. Finally, I have been waiting to recycle more items for the longest. The small black bin has never been enough for me and has always been overflowing with the items I recycle. KUDOS to the City fo Atlanta!

  4. Finally, I have been waiting to recycle more items for the longest. The small black bin has never been enough for me and has always been overflowing with the items I recycle. KUDOS to the City fo Atlanta!

  5. People shouldn’t be forced to take the bigger bins, but they will be popular.

    We also need to realize there isn’t necessarily a culture of recycling in Atlanta. Lots of households have bins, even have the large bins, but don’t recycle. There needs to be education efforts, door to door outreach, programs in the school in Atlanta, etc.

  6. People shouldn’t be forced to take the bigger bins, but they will be popular.

    We also need to realize there isn’t necessarily a culture of recycling in Atlanta. Lots of households have bins, even have the large bins, but don’t recycle. There needs to be education efforts, door to door outreach, programs in the school in Atlanta, etc.

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