Sandy Springs Mayor Eva Galambos, left, announces she will not seek reelection. Rusty Paul, right, waits in the wings. About 50 civic and political leaders attended Paul's announcement April 22 at Morgan Falls Park.
Sandy Springs Mayor Eva Galambos, left, announces she will not seek reelection. Rusty Paul, right, waits in the wings. About 50 civic and political leaders attended Paul’s announcement April 22 at Morgan Falls Park.

Rusty Paul handily won the race to become Sandy Springs’ next mayor, defeating Bob Brown with 80 percent of the vote.

However, the biggest news of the night came out of District 2.

City Councilwoman Dianne Fries was defeated in her bid for a third term by challenger Ken Dishman, who won with 62.5 percent of the vote.

“Obviously, I’m disappointed, especially with the turnout,” Fries said. “It was pitiful. I’m going to stay involved in the city. I’ve lived here all my life.”

A reporter left a message with Dishman seeking comment but had not received a reply as of 11 p.m. Tuesday.

District 6 had the most challengers and will be decided in a runoff Dec. 3.

Andy Bauman received 40.29 percent of the vote, the most of any candidate but not enough to avoid a runoff with John Stoj, who drew 29.12 percent of the vote. Candidate Patty Berkovitz received 26 percent of the vote and reported that some of her voters were unable to cast ballots in District 6 due to ballot problems.

Other winners on Nov. 5:

Graham McDonald in District 3, who replace outgoing Councilman Chip Collins.

Incumbent District 4 City Councilman Gabriel Sterling, who defeated challenger Tochie Blad.

Incumbent District 5 City Councilman Tibby DeJulio, who defeated challenger Clayton Cole.

District 1 City Councilman John Paulson was unopposed.

The Nov. 5 election marks the end of an era. Mayor Eva Galambos is leaving after two terms, and gave her endorsement to Paul, who praised the mayor on election night.

With the departure of Galambos, District 6 Councilwoman Karen Meinzen McEnerny and the defeat of Fries, the City of Sandy Springs will have no female elected representatives for the first time in its history.

Paul, who is also a city former councilman, said Sandy Springs’ downtown revitalization project will be the city’s biggest challenge going forward.

“We’ve got a major decision to make and got some big high heels to fill,” Paul told a crowd of 100 supporters at J. Christopher’s in Sandy Springs.

For the vote totals and percentages, click here.

– Pat Fox and Joe Earle contributed to this story.