Volunteers with Dunwoody Police Department’s Citizens on Patrol program hit the streets the morning of Nov. 15, ready to serve as extra eyes and ears for officers.

“My father raised me to support the local police department …and it is incumbent on us as citizens to be involved and engaged,” said Wayne Radloff, a retired Navy captain and one of the first eight members of the program.

Radloff, Ron Silvers, Jim Sturgis and Russ Thompson drove off from City Hall in the program’s two new white vehicles emblazoned with “Dunwoody Citizen Patrol” on the sides to make their first solo patrols after weeks of training.

From left are Wayne Radloff, Ron Silvers, Jim Sturgis and Russ Thompson. (Photos Dyana Bagby)
Dunwoody police, City Council members and the Citizens on Patrol volunteers.
Officer Mark Stevens.
Mayor Denis Shortal, far left, with Jim Sturgis and Russ Thompson, behind the wheel, ready for their first patrol.

“Since I’ve come to Dunwoody, I’ve heard about how much people here volunteer and this is a great example of that,” said Chief Billy Grogan, who announced the program in June.

The volunteers are not police officers and do not carry weapons, Grogan said. They have undergone extensive classroom and field training with other officers to be able to carry out such responsibilities as directing traffic and conducting business and residential safety checks.

Officer Mark Stevens, who helped organize the program and train the volunteers, said the slogan of the program is “See and Be Seen.”

Grogan said the hope is that by having “another set of eyes and ears” that the program will serve as a crime deterrent.

On hand for the program’s launch included Mayor Denis Shortal, Councilmembers Pam Tallmadge and Jim Riticher, City Manager Eric Linton.

The four other volunteers in the Citizens on Patrol program are Jim Roberts, Julian Black, Kris Bhatia and Jim Kilburn.

Dunwoody Police Chief Billy Grogan speaking at the launch of the Citizens on Patrol program on Nov. 15.