The Dunwoody City Council voted Nov. 5 to hire Carr, Rahn and Associates for $87,000 to conduct appraisals for right-of-way acquisitions for the Georgetown Gateway Project. The focus of the project extends along Chamblee-Dunwoody Road from I-285 to just south of the North Shallowford Road intersection and would include bike paths, sidewalks and streetscape improvements.

The city has identified 24 adjacent parcels where easements are needed for construction and seven of those parcels also require acquiring a narrow strip of right-of-way, according to a memo to the council from Public Works Director Michael Smith. To date, four right-of-way strips and easements have been acquired.

The Georgetown Gateway Project reaches from the intersection of North Shallowford Road and Cotillion Drive to the intersection of Chamblee-Dunwoody Road and Vermack Road via stretches of Cotillion Drive and Chamblee-Dunwoody Road. (City of Dunwoody)

Because the project includes federal funding, the city must follow Georgia Department of Transportation policies including contracting with a GDOT-prequalified firm for right-of-way appraisals, Smith explained.

Smith said the city at first delayed real estate appraisal and acquisition on six parcels closest to I-285 because the city believed GDOT’s I-285 managed lane project would include replacing the Chamblee-Dunwoody Road bridge over I-285 and include those parcels.

The city has since learned GDOT will end its I-285 project on the north side of the Cotillion Drive intersection and that only one parcel may be affected by both projects, Smith said in the memo. The new information made way for the city to move forward on right-of-way acquisitions.

The gateway extends from the intersection of North Shallowford Road and Cotillion Drive to the intersection of Chamblee-Dunwoody Road and Vermack Road along stretches of Cotillion Drive and Chamblee-Dunwoody Road.

This segment of Chamblee-Dunwoody Road is home to thousands of Dunwoody residents and provides access to over 13,000 vehicles trips a day, according to city officials. The city is planning to create pedestrian and bike connectivity for residents between neighborhoods, nearby public parks and commercial areas along the corridor.

The Georgetown Gateway Project originated with the city’s 2011 Comprehensive Transportation Plan as a way to create a signature entrance into the city. Public meetings were held in 2014.