A chemistry professor is joining the race for the Sandy Springs City Council District 2 seat.

Melody Kelley says she wants to help break people out of their silos and make the city more inclusive.

Melody Kelley, a chemistry professor at Perimeter College, filed her declaration of intent to campaign for the District 2 Sandy Springs City Council seat.

Jason Hamilton has also announced a campaign for the seat. Incumbent Steve Soteres previously said he was undecided about running for reelection in the November municipal election.

“It’s my home of choice, and it’s where I want to raise my daughter,” Kelley said. “So I just want to do my part as a public servant and help this place be the best, the best place that it can be, the most vibrant and inclusive place.”

Kelley wants to help build relationships and create opportunities for all of its families and residents.

She said she stresses relationship building, as the city has work to do to break out of silos and start reaching out to all the community.

“I understand we’re in a pandemic, but I think we need to be a little more intentional about outreach, a little more intentional about accessibility of information. You know, even things as simple as public comment.”

Kelley is an organic chemist by training and is a chemistry professor at Georgia State University at Perimeter College.

She has lived in Sandy Springs for the past five years with her daughter, who is a freshman at North Springs High School.

Her local involvement includes serving on PTO boards at Sandy Springs Middle School and at North Springs. She participated in Leadership Sandy Springs, is a member of the Citizens Police Academy with the Sandy Springs Police Department and is on the leadership council for Sandy Springs Together. She’s also a member of the city’s Charter Review Commission.

“I’ll just say that I definitely have a track record of being a public servant and a leader in the community, and I’m very proud of that,” she said.

Kelley said when she looks at Sandy Springs she doesn’t see the problems, but instead sees the opportunities. She identifies herself as an opportunity creator.

The race is non-partisan, and she said she plans to keep her efforts that way to represent everyone.